Toyota: “We see no demand for electric cars”

Toyota: “We see no demand for electric cars”

November 27, 2019 0 By autotimesnews

The Japanese auto giant believes that the time for electric cars has not yet arrived. And with “honest EV” at least three technologies will compete. Electrek calls the interview with Jack Hollis, head of marketing and Toyota North America, a striking example of foresight.

Toyota’s main Japanese automaker sees no demand for full-fledged electric cars and develops competing technologies, Toyota North America CEO Jack Hollis said during a roundtable at the Los Angeles Auto Show. Electrek, who provides a complete transcript of Hollins’ interview, considers this one of the short-sighted positions that the automotive giant with such resources can take now. Moreover, it is surprising that it was worth leaving the door of the conference room – and here they are, dozens of stands and prime ministers, production cars and prototypes – all with electric motors. Hi-Tech + provides the most important quotes.

Hollis says Toyota is driving efficiency at the head of the strategy: “Our gasoline engines are second to none.” Alternative technologies – electric cars, fuel cells, hybrid engines and plug-in hybrids – Toyota began to develop “about the same time”. The hybrid entered the market first and showed itself well due to rising fuel prices, the manager said.

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Now, plug-in hybrids and fuel cell vehicles, such as the Mirai sedan, are on the same trajectory. “[Only] then you turn to EV. All this is part of the plan, but is being implemented with a focus on consumer demand. Looking at this, you see that the demand for electric cars is now less than for hybrids. We are constantly working on EV models. But now there is no demand for it. ”

This summer, Toyota introduced a number of prototypes illustrating the vision of the future of electric vehicles.

Much of the interview is about Toyota’s decision to join the lawsuit, which aims to ban California from setting strict standards for car emissions at the state level. Hollis stated that a single national standard would be a boon to all. When asked about the boycott and the wave of canceling pre-orders for Toyota hybrid models that followed this decision, he stated that some people were just waiting to show their political stance and resent.

“Toyota is so successful not because we complain all the time, but because we give customers what they need,” the top manager emphasized.

Hollis was asked to comment on the multi-billion dollar investment in electric cars that Volkswagen is making, as well as the position of Ford, which introduced the first electric Mustang – the Mach-E crossover in Los Angeles.

After the “dieselgate”, the German concern simply had no other choice, Hollis emphasized, and “they became completely electric.”

“One can argue whether there is a demand for it. I do not think there is any evidence of demand for electric cars on the market. Every company must make this decision. ”

Ford is more careful in terms of scale, but sacrifices another – its main icon, the name Mustang. “Let’s see what comes of this,” he reasoned.

“Ford refuses sedans, transferring resources to electric cars. Volkswagen decided to go all-in on the EV issue and abandon internal combustion and other powertrains … I am with Toyota, and therefore I believe that the right choice is to invest in all types of powertrains. ”

He also emphasized that electric cars occupy only about 2% of the global market – but now, it seems, “everyone is fighting for this share.”

Hollis is not embarrassed by the illogical decision to invest in hydrogen fuel cells – one of the journalists doubted that this is in line with the idea of ​​”following demand.”

 “How do you know that the demand for electricity is greater than for fuel cells?” It’s like hybrid [cars] when we started. There is logic in what the client needs and how he uses the machine. Should a person charge for three hours or refuel in five minutes? ”

Hollis added: “Using batteries seems to be the area that the industry became interested in before the customer was ready for it. Toyota believes that we should go step by step – gasoline, a hybrid, plug-in hybrids, then fuel cells and electricity. ”

Also, the top manager emphasized that he does not yet see examples of companies that would be able to “make money on electric cars.”

Hollis is not embarrassed by the illogical decision to invest in hydrogen fuel cells – one of the journalists doubted that this is in line with the idea of ​​”following demand.”

 “How do you know that the demand for electricity is greater than for fuel cells?” It’s like hybrid [cars] when we started. There is logic in what the client needs and how he uses the machine. Should a person charge for three hours or refuel in five minutes? ”

Hollis added: “Using batteries seems to be the area that the industry became interested in before the customer was ready for it. Toyota believes that we should go step by step – gasoline, a hybrid, plug-in hybrids, then fuel cells and electricity. ”

Also, the top manager emphasized that he does not yet see examples of companies that would be able to “make money on electric cars.”