Ford patented door barriers to be activated in the event of an accident

Ford patented door barriers to be activated in the event of an accident

February 5, 2020 0 By autotimesnews

The presence of this technology will make the revived Ford Bronco SUV safer – in case of an accident, telescopic door barriers will automatically be pulled out (at the same time airbags will also work) in order to keep passengers from falling out of the passenger compartment.

Ford’s recently published patent application may hint at a new safety feature that the company can use in the new Bronco SUV. If the doors are closed and an accident occurs, the telescopic section will extend from the base of the front pillar, thereby protecting the passenger from falling out of the passenger compartment. The idea is very similar to an earlier Ford patent application, which may be related to the same Bronco.

According to the patent application of the American company, the telescopic sections will be in the retracted position during normal driving, and special sensors will determine whether the doors are installed. If a blow occurs (accident), the inflator is activated, as a result of which the telescopic part begins to unfold. The company claims that this door barrier can be made of plastic, metal, or any suitable material. The result will be a way to keep passengers from falling out of the car, while the telescopic barrier is being pulled out, and the airbags will also deploy.

 The automaker’s patent describes that there may be several telescopic elements along the door panel, and not one.

 Oddly enough, the application does not describe the second, rather obvious application of this idea. Instead of installing the barrier only during an accident, a natural alternative would be to make these barriers stationary when there are simply no ordinary doors. The result will be similar to the tubular doors available for the Jeep Wrangler SUV (see example below).

 A patent application was filed February 16, 2018, but the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office did not publish it until February 4, 2020. As with any other patent, there is no guarantee that the automaker intends to implement this technology in production cars.